The Kenai Fjords National Park covers an area of just under 670,000 acres, with the majority of the park only accessible by boat. Exit Glacier is the only park of the park that is accessible by road. The park is home to the Harding Icefield which at almost 300 square miles, is one of the largest icefields in the United States.

To see the park, we took an eight hour cruise which left from Seward Harbour. The marine life is incredible- humpback whales, Orcas, marine birds, sea otters, sea lions and puffins with their brightly coloured beaks. Our journey took us through Resurrection Bay, around the Aialik Peninsula, into Aialik Bay and Holgate Arm.

Sea Lions

Sea Lions basking in the sun

Pod of Orcas

Pod of Orcas

Sea Otter

Sea Otter

Kenai Fjords National Park is full of massive glaciers some that stretch miles across, huge walls of ice that slowly creak and grind.  There are just under 40 glaciers that flow from the Harding Icefield.  At Aialik Glacier we witnessed huge columns of ice fall into the water below.

Glacier, Kenai Fjords National Park

Glacier, Kenai Fjords National Park

Glacier, Kenai Fjords National Park

Glacier, Kenai Fjords National Park

Glacier, Kenai Fjords National Park

Holgate Glacier, Kenai Fjords National Park

Kenai Fjords National Park

Kenai Fjords National Park

Aialik Glacier, Kenai Fjords National Park

Wall of Ice- Aialik Glacier, Kenai Fjords National Park

After a full day of photographing incredible landscapes and amazing wildlife, it was time to head back to Seward Harbour. As we came into dock, we were greeted by a Bald Eagle who patiently sat on top of a pole whilst we rattled off the last few shots of the day.

Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle welcoming us back to Seward Harbour

Click here for the next stage of the Alaskan journey: Homer and the road back to Anchorage

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